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Slayer X | New Barbarian Subclass for Fifth Edition (Aberranterra)

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Wastelord option is available to a barbarian, in addition to those normally offered.

Path of Slayer X

Before the Fall, world governments were deadlocked in a race to create the ultimate killing machines. Set loose against opposing armies, these dangerous living-weapons could cut a swath through dozens—if not hundreds—of soldiers, tearing their enemies apart like paper dolls. While each program had a different name, generally, these soldiers-of-mass-destruction were known as Slayers X.

Now that the big governments of Before have collapsed, those who tread the Path of Slayer X wander the rad-wastes searching for purpose in a world gone mad. Most were left without memories of who they were. Many don’t even remember what was done to them; as time goes on, they learn more and more about their enhanced nature.

Internal Weaponry

At 3rd level, you discover that you’ve been enhanced with weapons within your body. Choose one of the following options:

Claws. You have steel claws that eject from your wrists, knuckles, or fingertips which act as natural weapons that replace your unarmed strike. As a bonus action, you can discharge or retract your claws. You gain the following benefits while you are unarmed and your claws are extended:

  • You can use Dexterity instead of Strength for the attack and damage rolls of your unarmed strikes.
  • On a hit, your unarmed strike deals 1d6 slashing damage instead of the normal damage of your unarmed strike.
  • When you use the Attack action with an unarmed strike on your turn, you can make one unarmed strike as a bonus action.
  • While raging, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn so long as you use your claws to make the attacks. At 5th level, when you gain the Extra Attack feature, you can attack three times using your claws.

Steel-Reinforced Arms. The muscles and bones in your arms have been augmented with magical steel. You gain the following benefits:

  • You have advantage on all Strength checks, even when you aren’t raging.
  • You can roll a d4 in place of the normal damage of your unarmed strike.
  • During a rage, if you make a Strength check or Strength saving throw and fail, you can reroll one of the d20s. You must take the new result even if it is lower.
  • The bonus to your damage rolls you gain while raging increases by 3.

Magical Enhancements

Starting at 6th level, your unarmed strikes count as magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance and immunity to nonmagical attacks and damage. In addition, your unarmored defense improves. While you are not wearing any armor, you gain a magical +1 bonus to your AC.

Augmented Senses

At 10th level, your senses improve. While you are raging, you can see invisible creatures and objects as if they were visible, and you can see into the Ethereal Plane. Ethereal creatures and objects appear ghostly and translucent.

Lash Out

Once you reach 14th level, when you take damage from a creature that you can see, you can use your reaction to move up to half your movement speed towards the attacker and make one unarmed attack against it if you are able.


Get the PDF + One Additional Subclass

In addition to the subclass presented here, if you get the PDF you get one additional barbarian subclass option: Path of the Waste Lords.

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Patrons of Copper Tier and up get this content in PDF form PLUS 70+ additional PDFs including new player options, races, feats, magic items, spells, adventures, and more.

 

 

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Path of the Psychorampager | New Player Option for Fifth Edition

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Path of the Psychorampager option is available in addition to those normally offered.

Note: this class uses psionic options detailed in the Psion class entry.

Path of the Psychorampager

There are those who’d argue that psionics stem from the developed portion of a humanoid brain. However, those who follow the Path of the Psychorampager know better. Wild talents are drawn from the core of a creature’s being, forming its primal instinct and shielding it from the dangers that pervade its life. The barbarian that embraces this power is more than an aggressive combatant, but a terror to behold. Psychorampagers combine the raw strength of flesh with the unfettered potential of the mind.

Psychic Fury

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, you can channel psychic energy into your weapon strikes. While you’re raging, the first creature you hit on each of your turns with a weapon attack takes an extra 2d6 psychic damage.

As you gain levels in this class, the psychic damage increases. At 10th level, this damage increases by 1d6 (3d6), and again at 17th level (4d6).

Psychometabolism

At 3rd level, while raging you can use your bonus action to regain hit points equal to 1d4 + your Constitution modifier + your barbarian level. Alternatively, you can use this power to cure one disease or neutralize one poison affecting you. Or you can use this power to heal 2 points of ability damage, such as from a shadow’s Strength Drain attack.

You can only use this feature once per rage.

Mental Fortress

At 6th level, while you are raging, you have advantage on Intelligence and Wisdom saving throws against psionic powers as well as enchantment and illusion spells.

Expanded Fortress

At 10th level, each creature of your choice within 10 feet of you gains the benefits of your Mental Fortress feature.

Psychic Backlash

At 14th level, your innate psychic powers automatically retaliate on your behalf. Immediately after a creature hits you with an attack while you are raging, you can use your reaction to force that creature to make an Intelligence saving throw. The DC is 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Wisdom modifier. On a failed save, the creature takes psychic damage equal to half your barbarian level.


Psionics: A New Book by DMDave

Towards the end of this month, this entry along with many others will be included in a new book titled Psionics. Patrons at all levels will have first access to this.

Check out DMDave’s Patreon

Art by Wayne Reynolds.

 

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Sword and Sorcery | New Game Supplement for Fifth Edition (BroadSword Spoilers) – Part 2

This article series details Sword and Sorcery in Fifth Edition and how you can implement it in your own games. It is also part of BroadSword Magazine, so if you are a subscriber and don’t wish to be spoiled, steer clear. In addition, this is not the final form of the content. Just the staging ground so I can start getting feedback on the material from Patreon and Reddit (similar to the way that WotC tests new material in their Unearthed Arcana series). Once I’ve done so, it will be removed from the site.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction. What is Sword and Sorcery? And how I can I use it in my games?
  2. Sword and Sorcery Subclasses. What sort of subclasses exist in Sword and Sorcery worlds?
  3. New Setting: The Castle of Chaos. What is the Castle of Chaos? How can I use it in my Fifth Edition games?
  4. New Adventure: The Forsaken Peak Part 1. The Goblin Mine. What is the Forsaken Peak? And what is the Goblin Mine?
  5. New Monsters. What monsters are common in Sword and Sorcery settings? What new monsters can I incorporate into my Fifth Edition games?
  6. Seven Deadly Sins Artifacts. What are the Seven Deadly Sins Artifacts? How can I use them in my Fifth Edition games?

Part 2. Subclasses

The two subclasses listed below are available for characters to choose in addition to those normally offered.

At 3rd level, the barbarian gains the Primal Path feature and may choose the Destroyer option. And at 3rd level, the rogue gains the Roguish archetype feature and may choose the Sneak option.

barbarian-destroyer
Art by Boris Vallejo.

Destroyer (Barbarian Primal Path)

Some barbarians are guardians. Others find their place in nature. Then there are those who seek only to destroy and conquer. These barbarian destroyers use their rage as a tool for unfettered violence. There are destroyers that dread this path, regretful of what they become when consumed by the fire inside. Others, however, enjoy the darkness and embrace it. “Crush your foes. See them driven before you. Hear the lamentations of the women.”

Ferocity

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, if you make a melee weapon attack against a creature while raging and the attack doesn’t reduce the creature’s hit points to 0, you can use your bonus action to make another melee weapon attack against the same target.

Siege Warrior

At 6th level, your attacks deal double damage to objects and structures. In addition, you have advantage on Strength checks made to break objects.

Fearful Presence

Beginning at 10th level, you exude an aura of fear that intimidates your foes. As an action, you force each creature of your choice that you can see within 10 feet of you to make a Wisdom saving throw (DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier). On a failed save, a creature becomes frightened of you for 1 minute. The frightened creature can repeat this saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself with a success. Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you complete a long rest.

Avatar of Destruction

At 14th level, any time you reduce a creature to 0 hit points while raging, you gain 5 temporary hit points. These temporary hit points remain until your rage ends. In addition, as long as you have the temporary hit points granted by this feature, you gain the following benefits:

  • You can attack three times, instead of twice, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.
  • You can’t be charmed or frightened.
rogue-sneak
Art by Wizards of the Coast.

Sneak (Roguish Archetype)

Sure, it sounds redundant, don’t it? A rogue “sneak.” Hell, they’re all sneaks, ain’t they? But the rogue sneak is a thief that’s embraced its nature. There’s no excuse for what they do and they know it. Stealing things? Bring it on. Breaking and entering? Don’t mind if I do! Hiding in the shadows and sniping at foes? Gladly.

Distracting Feint

Starting at 3rd level, you can use your bonus action to make a single weapon attack against a target as long as you use a ranged or finesse weapon. If the attack hits, you deal 0 damage. You then have advantage on attack rolls against that target until the end of your turn.

Concealed Weapon

At 3rd level, it is nearly impossible to detect a weapon that’s hidden on your person. You have advantage on Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) checks made to conceal a carried weapon. The concealed weapon can weigh no more than 2 pounds.

Mislead

By 9th level, you’ve become a master of scams and cons, allowing you access to deeper pockets and heavier purses. If you use your action to make a Charisma (Deception) check contested by a target that is within 5 feet of you’s Wisdom (Insight) check and succeed on the contest, you can use your bonus action to make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check with advantage against the same target to pick its pocket without it noticing.

Escape Artist

At 13th level, it’s almost impossible to bind you. You can have advantage on ability checks to escape from nonmagical restraints such as manacles or a creature that has you grappled. In addition, you can pick locks even without the use of thieves’ tools. As long as you have a capable implement–such as a hairpin, a fork, or another small object (DM’s discretion)–you can make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check to pick the lock instead of a Dexterity check using thieves’ tools.

Trial and Error

Beginning at 17th level, if you make an attack roll against a target that you can see and miss, you have advantage against that same target until you hit it. Once you do so, you can’t use this feature again until you finish a short or long rest.


Next: Part 3. The Castle of Chaos Setting

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Archers | Player Supplement for Fifth Edition (Part 1)

This article adds new rules, subclasses, prestige classes, magic items, and more for players interested in expanding archer characters in Fifth Edition.


All of this content is FREE for you to use in your Fifth Edition campaigns. However, if you’re interested in getting this content in PDF format, patrons of every tier get this PDF plus others for FREE. It’s only $3/month to sign up. The finalized version includes corrections and final adjustments, plus bonus content.

Check out DM Dave’s Patreon.


Here is a summary of what’s included in this article:


Part 1: Archer Subclasses

The three subclasses listed below are available for characters to choose in addition to those normally offered.

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature and may choose the Warden option. Monks at 3rd level gain the Monastic Tradition feature and may choose the Way of the Curved Arrow option. Finally, a 3rd-level rogue gains the Roguish Archetype feature and may choose the Trickshot option.

barbarian-archer
Art by Ni Yipeng.

Warden (Barbarian Primal Path)

Many see barbarians as savage nomads, moving from place to place without any real destination to call home. However, those who take up the mantle of Warden are sworn to protect specific locations from dangers. Wardens take on aspects of both barbarians and rangers, balancing their rage-driven melee prowess with deadly ranged attacks.

Angry Arrow

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, while raging, if you make a ranged weapon attack against a creature within 30 feet of you and miss, you can use your bonus action to make a second ranged weapon attack against the same target.

Improvised Attacks

At 3rd level, when you are wielding a ranged weapon that deals at least 1d6 damage, you can use the weapon itself to make melee attacks. On a successful hit, you deal bludgeoning damage equal to 1d4 plus your Strength modifier. The melee attack does not expend ammunition.

Magic of the Warden

At 6th level, you can invoke nature’s might to assist you. You know the following spells: fog cloud, hunter’s mark, or pass without trace. Once you cast a spell using this feature, you can’t do so again until you complete a long rest. Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for each of these spells.

Horde Fighter

At 10th level, while raging, opportunity attacks against you are made with disadvantage. In addition, if a creature hits you with an opportunity attack while you are raging, you can use your reaction to make a melee weapon attack against that creature.

Ranged Rage

At 14th level, while you are raging and you make a ranged weapon attack against a target within 30 feet of you, you can add your Rage Damage bonus to the damage roll.

monk-archer
Art by Murillo Miranda.

Way of the Curved Arrow (Monk Monastic Tradition)

Monks of the Way of the Curved Arrow turn their ki and martial arts towards archery. Sometimes called Zen Archers, these monks are just as effective at a distance as they are in close combat.

It’s believed that Zen Archers were original a subsect of the Way of the Kensei.

Longbow Proficiency

Starting when you choose this Monastic Tradition at 3rd level, you gain proficiency with longbows if you don’t already have it. The longbow counts as a monk weapon for you.

Zen Archery

At 3rd level, you can use your bonus action to make your ranged weapon attacks with your bow more deadly. When you do so, choose one of the following benefits. The benefit lasts until the end of your current turn.

  • You gain a +2 bonus to your ranged weapon attack rolls made using shortbows and longbows.
  • A target you hit with a shortbow or longbow takes an extra 1d4 damage of the weapon’s type.

Bonus Language

At 3rd level, your connection to the Elemental Plane of Air grants you the ability to read, write, and speak Auran.

Ki Arrow

At 6th level, you extend your ki into your fire arrows. Once per turn, when you fire an arrow from a shortbow or longbow as part of the Attack action, you can spend the requisite ki to apply one of the Ki Arrow options below to that arrow. You must decide to use the option before you make your attack roll. Once you make your attack roll, the effect ends.

Curved Arrow. You can spend 1 ki point to have your next attack with your shortbow or longbow ignore half cover and three-quarters cover.

Deadly Arrow. You can spend 1 kit point have your next attack with your shortbow or longbow deal extra damage to the target equal to your Martial Arts die. You can use this feature only once on each of your turns.

Force Arrow. You can spend 2 ki points to turn your arrow into a bolt of crackling force energy. When you fire your shortbow or crossbow as part of your Attack action, the arrow automatically hits a target of your choice within 120 feet of you. The arrow then deals force damage equal to the weapon’s normal damage die plus your Wisdom modifier.

Arrow of the Wrathful

At 11th level, you gain the ability to fire a devastating burst of energy from your longbow or shortbow. As an action, a brilliant ray of energy forming a line 100 feet long and 10 feet wide blasts out from you. Each creature in the area must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 2d6 radiant damage. A creature doesn’t need to make the save if the creature is behind total cover. You can increase the ray’s damage by spending ki points. Each point you spend, to a maximum of 3, increases the damage by 2d6.

Flurry of Arrows

At 17th level, when you use your Flurry of Blows, you can choose to make up to three ranged weapon attacks from a shortbow or longbow in place of the two unarmed strikes normally allowed. Each attack made in this way must target a different creature that is within 30 feet of you.

rogue-archer
Art by JuYoung Ha.

Trickshot (Roguish Archetype)

Rogues are already well-known for their ability to snipe from the shadows. Rogue Trickshots, however, have taken their love of archery to the next level.

Longbow Proficiency

Starting when you choose this Roguish Archetype at 3rd level, you gain proficiency with longbows if you don’t already have it.

Aimed Shot

At 3rd level, you can use your bonus action to carefully aim your next shot. Choose a target within 100 feet of you. Then, select one of the following benefits:

  • The next ranged weapon attack roll you make against that target is made with advantage.
  • The next ranged weapon attack roll you make against that target ignores half cover and three-quarters cover.

Instinctive Shot

At 9th level, if you are surprised at the beginning of combat and aren’t incapacitated, you can act normally on your first turn, but only if you make a ranged weapon attack before doing anything else on that turn.

Debilitating Shot

At 13th level, you can use your arrow to temporarily subdue foes. When you use your Aimed Shot feature, you can choose one of the following benefits in place of the other benefits already offered:

  • If the next ranged weapon attack you make against the target hits, the attack deals normal damage and the target drops a held item of your choice. If the target is holding the item with two or more hands, it can make a Strength saving throw with a DC equal to 10 or half the damage taken (whichever is higher). On a successful saving throw, the target does not drop the item.
  • If the next ranged weapon attack you make against the target hits, the attack deals normal damage and the target’s speed is reduced to 0 until the end of its next turn.

Bullseye

Starting at 17th level, your aimed shots are capable of instant death. When you attack and hit a creature that you’ve targeted with your Aim Shot feature, you may forgo one of the feature’s normal benefit offerings to force the target to make a Constitution saving throw (DC 8 + your Dexterity modifier + your proficiency bonus). On a failed saving throw, double the damage of your attack against the creature. You can use this feature three times, and regain expended uses after you finish a long rest.


Next: Part 2. The Blind Archer Prestige Class

Thumbnail art by Ni Yipeng.

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Barbarian Path of the Bloodied | New Player Option for Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition

This one comes as a request from one of my patrons. Here is what he asked for:

Hi Dave, I’d love to see what you can create for a Barbarian subclass around the idea of the more damage he takes, the more damage he can dish out. Even better if his attacks are unarmed. I’m just picturing a guy that goes total berserk bloodlust and thrives on the punishment he’s taking.

So here is what’s necessary mechanically:

  • The more damage the barbarian takes, the more damage the barbarian can deal.
  • Unarmed attack focus.

Sounds like something from a Korean action movie! Haha

But yeah, I totally dig the idea. Let’s see what I can do with it.

Design Notes

A quick note on designs. The extra damage the barbarian ends up dealing falls roughly in line with how much damage the zealot path does just factored in a little differently. The idea was to put more emphasis on DPR over tanking/buffing. Only the last two features allow the barbarian to tough it out as a tank.

Barbarian Primal Path

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Path of the Bloodied option is available to a barbarian, in addition to those normally offered.

Path of the Bloodied

There are those who throw themselves into combat with little regard to their own well being. As they take more hits, break more bones, and shed more blood, their rage grows. These ferocious creatures are known as the Bloodied.

Rampage

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, the more damage you take, the more effective of a combatant you become. While raging, if you start your turn in combat with fewer than half of your hit points remaining and you aren’t incapacitated, your rage damage is three times the normal bonus.

Brutal Boxer

At 3rd level, your anger drowns out your formal combat training as you turn to your fists to make attacks. While raging, when you take the attack action, you can immediately make a single unarmed attack as a bonus action once on each of your turns. The damage your unarmed attack deals is 1d4 plus your Strength modifier.

Fierce Grappler

At 6th level, you gain proficiency in Strength (Athletics) if you don’t already have it and you add twice your proficiency bonus to Strength (Athletics) checks when grappling or attempting to escape a grapple. In addition, whenever you successfully grapple a creature, you automatically deal bludgeoning damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier.

Rapid Adaptation

At 10th level, while you are raging and you take damage from acid, cold, fire, lightning, or thunder damage, you can use your reaction to gain resistance to that damage type; this resistance takes effect before you take damage from the triggering effect and lasts for 1 hour. Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you complete a short or long rest.

Unkillable

Starting at 14th level, your rage can push you beyond normal mortal limitations. When you make a successful Constitution saving throw to avoid falling unconscious using your Relentless Rage feature, you regain a number of hit points equal to your barbarian level instead of the 1 hit point normally offered from the Relentless Rage feature.

 

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BroadSword Magazine is now on Kickstarter!

It’s hard to believe that we were funded in less than five hours. Thanks so much to everyone’s that’s chipped in with their support.

If you haven’t already heard, go ahead and check it out now. This monthly magazine looks to capture the feel of the old Dungeon/Dragon magazines from the ’80s and ’80s. Old School Feel with New School (5e) rules.

Check out BroadSword Magazine on Kickstarter

Art by Wayne Reynolds/Wizards of the Coast

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Barbarian Pack Leader Primal Path | New Player Option for Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition

This entry comes as a Patron request and will be a part of DMDave Magazine #1 released sometime at the end of March/early April.

Here is the original request:

Barbarian pact leader. Kinda like the ranger beast conclave, but make it feel less like your taming the animal but ur working with a pack mate


Playtest Content

The material here is presented for playtesting and to spark your imagination. These game mechanics are in draft form, usable in your campaign but not refined by final game design and editing. They aren’t officially part of the game.

Constructive feedback is welcome and appreciated in either comments or social media. If you can give me a valid reason with examples why something is off, 9/10 I’m likely to make changes to the content and credit you for doing so. Otherwise, feedback without anything to back it up gets ignored (or at most a smile emoji like this 🙂 ) Thanks!


Design Notes

So what’s a barbarian? A tank. DPR. Crowd control. And that’s about it, right? There are a few versions that have buffs, but more or less their job is to take the hits and hit the thing that gave the hits. So, throwing in a pet changes the dynamics some.

The biggest consideration I had to make while creating this subclass was nerfing the beast companion so that it only worked when raging (which I hated doing).

Otherwise, it would have been too powerful. Rangers can get away with it because their baseline powers are kinda bleh. But with the beast companion, they get a little juice.

Of course, once the barbarian gets its Extra Attack, its beast companion operates on its own and all is right in the world.

Combat Bond is just repurposed from mounted combatant, finally making this a true tank subclass (meat shield, baby).

You get a choice at 10th level for your power–obviously many will see a lot of synergy with the pack tactics power and the 14th capstone, but the others are nice, too, especially for those folks who like to go crit fishing.

The 14th-level capstone is probably going to be the most controversial. Mathematically speaking, the joint attack allows you to deal an average of ~3 more damage on a hit since it’s basically the same as rolling advantage on both your attacks. Still, this should work out to about the same that the other reaction-based barbarian capstones would. Plus, it only works if you’re animal companion is standing. At 14th level, they’ve got 56 hit points, far less than the 160+ your barbarian is going to have at the same level and none of your good saves.

Let me know what you think down in the comments below.

Edit: made a bunch of correction thanks to some sharp minds over on reddit that noticed some boo-boos. Thanks, folks!

barbarian-wolf
Art by Tong Yan

Primal Paths

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Pack Leader option is available to a barbarian, in addition to those normally offered.

Pack Leader

Having a strong connection to nature, barbarians are often around animals. Of course, many barbarians take on the aspects of those animals as their totem. There are some, though, who believe that nature and man should still remain separate, yet equal. These followers of the primal path of the pack leader walk alongside animals, encouraging their companions to work alongside them, but always with free will.

Barbarian’s Companion

At 3rd level, you gain a beast companion that accompanies you on your adventures and is triggered to fight alongside you while you are raging. Choose a beast that is no larger than Medium that has a challenge rating of 1/4 or lower (appendix D of the PHB presents statistics for the hawk, panther, and wolf as examples). Add your proficiency bonus to the beast’s AC, attack rolls, and damage rolls, as well as to any saving throws and skills it is proficient in. Its hit point maximum equals the hit point number in its stat block or four times your barbarian level, whichever is higher. Like any creature, it can spend Hit Dice during a short rest to regain hit points.

Your beast acts independently of you, but it always obeys your commands. In combat, it rolls its own initiative and acts on its own turn. On your turn, you can verbally command the beast where to move (no action required by you). You can use your action to verbally command it to take the Dash, Disengage, Dodge, or Help action. While you are raging, you can make one weapon attack yourself when you command the beast to take the Attack action. Additionally, once you have the Extra Attack feature, you can make one weapon attack yourself when you command the beast to take the Attack action.

If you are incapacitated or absent, the beast acts on its own, focusing on protecting you and itself. The beast never requires your command to use its reaction, such as when making an opportunity attack.

If the beast dies, you can obtain a new companion by spending 8 hours magically bonding with a beast that isn’t hostile to you and that meets the requirements.

Combat Bond

Starting at 6th level, you and your beast companion have learned how to work together in combat. As long as you and your companion are within 5 feet of each other, you can force an attack targeted at your beast companion to target you instead and vice versa.

Beast Tactics

At 10th level, you and your beast have trained extensively to work as one cohesive unit. You gain one of the following features of your choice.

Improved Critical. Your beast companion’s weapon attacks score a critical hit on a roll of 19 or 20.

Pack Tactics. Your beast companion has advantage on attack rolls against a creature if you are within 5 feet of the creature and you aren’t incapacitated.

Protector. When a creature that your beast companion can see attacks a target other than it that is within 5 feet of it, it can use its reaction to impose disadvantage on the attack roll.

Joint Attack

At 14th level, while you are raging, as long as you and your companion are within 5 feet of each other, you can make one weapon attack yourself when you command the beast to take the Help action. In addition, any hit you score against a creature while your beast is helping you is a critical hit.

 

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Get 13 NEW 5E Subclasses in PDF format!

If you haven’t heard, I’ve got a book out called EVIL. It’s 56 pages of new Fifth Edition subclasses, races, magic items, monsters, and more all in an easy-to-read PDF.

Get the book EVIL by DMDave, now!

Art by Tong Yan on Artstation.

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Barbarian Path of the Void | New Class Option for Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition

This entry is the first part of the Dungeon.Dude Promotional Campaign on Instagram. Together, the Instagram D&D Community helped Dungeon.Dude, a hard-working artist, get over 2,100 followers! Outstanding job, folks!

Playtest Content

The material here is presented for playtesting and to spark your imagination. These game mechanics are in draft form, usable in your campaign but not refined by
final game design and editing. They aren’t officially part of the game.

Constructive feedback is welcome and appreciated in either comments or social media. If you can give me a valid reason with examples why something is off, 9/10 I’m likely to make changes to the content and credit you for doing so. Otherwise, feedback without anything to back it up gets ignored (or at most a smile emoji like this 🙂 ) Thanks!

Design Notes

This barbarian primal path is designed to be a 1v1 duelist versus casters. Its job is to get to a caster as soon as it’s able and take it out as fast as it can. What will it need in order to do that?

  • Obviously, it will need some form of magic resistance.
  • Hits that could cause spellcasters to lose their spellcasting ability could be good, too.
  • Maybe even a nifty power that lets it smack away spells coming at it (and potentially reflect it back on the caster).
  • Finally, I’ll toss in something that protects its allies against AoE spells.

I worked to balance it against preexisting barbarian primal paths, particularly bear totems and zealots. The original version of the 6th level feature had unlimited use, but I restricted it to 1/rage only. Because it’s so niche, I also left the 14th level feature wide open for unlimited use (plus it requires the barb to be within 5 feet for it work).

mtg-barbarian

Primal Path

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following option is available to a barbarian, in addition to those normally offered.

Path of the Void

Especially superstitious barbarians not only distrust magic users but outright despise them and may even hunt them on occasion. These void barbarians, as they are known, see warlocks, wizards, and sorcerers as dangers that need to be dealt with quickly. Calling upon the forces of anti-magic in the universe, void barbarians charge directly for the casters in nearly every encounter. After all, the faster the spellcaster is dead, the better all will be.

Magic Sense

Beginning at 3rd level when you choose this path, you can sense magic within 15 feet of you at will so long as you can see or touch the source of magic. This trait otherwise works like the detect magic spell but isn’t itself magical.

Spell Resistance

At 3rd level, you are better at avoiding magical attacks and effects. While you are raging, you have advantage on all saving throws against spells.

Deflect Spells

Starting at 6th level, you can use your reaction to deflect or reflect a spell with a melee weapon when you are hit by a magic missile spell, a line spell, or a spell that requires a ranged spell attack while you are raging. When you do so, the damage you take from the attack is reduced by the weapon’s damage roll used to deflect the spell + your Barbarian level (for example, if you are an 8th-level barbarian and you deflect a spell attack with a greatsword, you reduce the spell’s damage by 2d6 + 8). If you reduce the damage to 0, the spell is reflected back at the caster as though it originated from you, turning the caster into the target. If you are the target of a spell that creates more than one projectile such as a magic missile or eldritch blast you may only deflect one part of the spell (a single beam, bolt, etc) of the spell. You can use this feature only once per rage.

Expand the Void

At 10th level, you can draw upon the power of the void to protect your allies from spells. You do not have to be raging to use this feature. As a reaction, you expand your natural spell resistance.  Creatures of your choice within 10 feet of you gain advantage on all saving throws against spells until the start of your next turn. At 18th level, the range increases to 15 feet.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Spell Interruption

Starting at 14th level, you have learned to recognize when a spellcaster is about to cast a spell and stop it before it happens. When you see a creature within 5 feet of you casting a spell, you can use your reaction to make a melee weapon attack against that creature. If the attack hits and the creature was casting a spell of 3rd level or lower, its spell fails and has no effect. If it is casting a spell of 4th level or higher, the caster must make a Constitution saving throw with a DC of 10 or half the damage it takes, whichever number is higher. On a failed save, the spell fails and has no effect.

 

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Next: Bard College of Death.

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Path of the Pyromaniac | Barbarian Subclass for Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition

It’s late. I’ve eaten a cake that was in the disguise of a donut (thanks Hurts Donuts, Norman) and drank a lot of stale, three-hour old coffee. If you thought I made some goofy shit earlier today, you ain’t seen nuthin’ yet.

This comes in as “kind of” a request from one of my Facebook fans, Jordan. He wanted me to create molotov cocktails for D&D. Fortunately, those already exist: alchemist’s fire. But I didn’t want to just let myself get out of a request so easy. So I asked Jordan what his favorite class was: barbarian.

A barbarian sub that specializes in alchemist’s fire? Let’s do it.

Playtest Content

The material here is presented for playtesting and to spark your imagination. These game mechanics are in draft form, usable in your campaign but not refined by
final game design and editing. They aren’t officially part of the game.

Constructive feedback is welcome and appreciated in either comments or social media. If you can give me a valid reason with examples why something is off, 9/10 I’m likely to make changes to the content and credit you for doing so. Otherwise, feedback without anything to back it up gets ignored (or at most a smile emoji like this 🙂 ) Thanks!

Primal Paths

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Path of the Pyromaniac option is available to a barbarian in addition to those normally offered.

Path of the Pyromaniac

Some people just want to watch the world burn. With soot-covered hands and countless burn scars, you stalk the earth with a flask of alchemist fire in one hand and a fistful of “get the fuck out of my way” in the other.

If an enemy is anything less than ashes when you walk away from a battlefield, you’re not happy.

Bonus Proficiencies

Starting when you take this path at 3rd level, you gain proficiency in alchemist’s supplies and you are proficient with improvised weapons.

Cocktail Maker

You are a master of creating and throwing alchemist fire. When you choose this path at 3rd level, you gain the following benefits:

  • You can spend 10 minutes to create up to 4 flasks of alchemist’s fire. As part of the process, you must combine the chemicals–which can be alcohol, oil, or any other flammable liquids–into a breakable flask with a total combined value of at least 10 gold pieces.
  • Alchemist fire created by you is much more potent than normal. On a hit, your alchemist fire deals 1d6 fire damage at the start of each of your target’s turns instead of 1d4. This damage increases by 1d6 when you reach 11th level (2d6), and 17th level (3d6).
  • The save DC to extinguish the flames of your alchemist’s fire is DC 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Dexterity modifier instead of DC 10.
  • Your range for throwing alchemist fire increases to 30 feet.
  • While you are raging, you can throw alchemist fire as a bonus action on each of your turns.

Friend of Fire

At 6th level, you gain resistance to fire damage. Moreover, when you throw alchemist’s fire, you can choose one creature within range, or choose two creatures within range that are within 5 feet of each other. When targeting two creatures, you must make a separate ranged attack for each target, however, you only use one flask of alchemist’s fire for both targets.

Fire Breather

At 10th level, while you are raging, you can drink one of your flasks of alchemist’s fire as part of your movement. After you do, for 1 minute, you can use your action to breathe fire in a 15-foot cone. Each creature in that area must make a Dexterity saving throw with a DC of 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Constitution modifier, taking 3d6 fire damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. In addition, if the target is a creature or a flammable object, it ignites. Until a creature takes an action to douse the fire, the target takes 3 (1d6) fire damage at the start of each of its turns. You can’t use this feature again until after you finish a long rest.

Fire Fanatic

Starting at 14th level, while you’re raging, you have advantage on all attack rolls made against any creature that is on fire, naturally or otherwise.

 

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Path of the Reveler | Barbarian Subclass for Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition

At 2nd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following Path of the Reveler option is available to play a barbarian, in addition to the normal options offered.

Path of the Reveler

Raging isn’t always about anger. Sometimes, it’s about being getting lost in the moment. This is what those who follow the Path of the Reveler believe. Also known as a “festive brute”, the Reveler’s rage is one that involves heavy drinking, dance, and cheering. That’s not to say it still doesn’t still act like a barbarian. Punches are still thrown, hits are landed, and the barbarian creates destruction in its wake. Yet, it’s a lively destruction, the type that those on the receiving end might even remember as being somewhat enjoyable.

Reveler’s Dance

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, you dance while you rage, often with others–whether they want to or not. While raging, you can use your bonus action to target one creature within 5 feet of you. The creature must succeed on a Strength saving throw (DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength modifier). The creature can willingly fail its saving throw. On a failed save, you and the creature switch places and the creature has disadvantage on its next attack roll or ability check.

Reveler’s Fortitude

At 6th level, your body is so used to long nights of copious drinking, you actually gain benefits from it. You gain resistance to poison damage and immunity to the poisoned condition. In addition, you have advantage on saving throws to avoid taking levels of exhaustion.

Reveler’s Cheer

Beginning at 10th level, you can use your action to elevate others around you, even your enemies. When you do so, choose one creature that you can see within 30 feet of you. If the creature can see or hear you, it must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw (DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier) or be charmed by you until the end of your next turn. On subsequent turns, you can use your action to extend the duration of this effect on the charmed creature until the end of your next turn. This effect ends if the creature ends its turn out of the line of sight or more than 60 feet away from you.

If the creature succeeds on its saving throw, you can use your reaction to make a melee weapon attack against that creature.

Reveler’s Slamdance

At 14th level, all of the excitement you cause brings out the rowdiness in others while you are raging. As an action, you can use 5 feet of your move speed and then hit a creature within 5 feet of you with an unarmed strike attack. If the attack hits, you may use another 5 feet of your move speed and then hit another creature within 5 feet of you with an unarmed strike attack. The second creature must be a different creature than the first. You may continue to use 5 feet of your move speed and make unarmed strike attacks against different creatures in this manner until you run out of creatures to hit, use up all your normal movement speed, or miss one of your unarmed strike attacks. After your slamdance, you may not take bonus actions or reactions until the end of your next turn.


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Barbarian Primal Path: Path of Ooze | New Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition Player Option

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The Path of Ooze option is available to a barbarian, in addition to those offered in the Player’s Handbook.

This is playtest material and not official. Please feel free to leave any comments and constructive criticisms down in the comments section.

Path of Ooze

Not all barbarians are raging outcasts that live on the surface world. There are those that live and operate underground, in the Underdark or other expansive below-surface ecologies. And often, the barbarians in this environment learn to live with the creatures that lurk there, especially oozes and slimes.

Seeing value in their slimy way of life, a barbarian that lives in close proximity to oozes starts to take on aspects of the creatures. Some ooze path barbarians willing choose to become hosts for ooze symbiotes (similar to the oozemancer class). Working with their gooey, internal companion, these barbarians are just as dangerous as any other barbarian, albeit a bit grimier.

Barbarian Level Feature
3rd
Ally to Oozes, Pseudopod (1d6)
6th
Primordial Power
10th Gelatinous Shell
14th
Pseudopod (2d6), Corrosive Skin

Ally to Oozes

Beginning at 3rd level, you have the ability to comprehend and verbally communicate with oozes. The knowledge and awareness of many oozes are limited by their intelligence, but at a minimum, oozes can give you information about nearby locations and monsters, including whatever they can perceive or have perceived within the past day. You might be able to persuade an ooze to perform a small favor for you, at the DM’s discretion.

Pseudopod

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level you can sprout an oozy pseudopod that helps you in combat while you are raging. You can use your bonus action on each of your turns to make a single melee weapon attack with this pseudopod that deals 1d6 bludgeoning damage on a successful hit. You can use your Dexterity or Strength modifier for your attack or damage rolls (your choice). At 14th level, this damage increases by 1d6 (2d6).

Primordial Power

Starting at 6th level, you can tap into the oozing might of your primordial ancestors. Your pseudopod attacks count as magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance and immunity to nonmagical attacks and damage. In addition, you gain resistance to acid and poison damage.

Gelatinous Shell

At 10th level, you can expand your internal ooze to form a protective bubble around you and your fellow adventurers while you rest. You can cast the Leomund’s tiny hut spell.

Corrosive Skin

By 14th level, when you are raging, your body is coated in an acidic substance that helps protect you. Any creature that touches you or hits you with a melee weapon attack while within 5 feet of you takes 1d6 acid damage.

 

Thanks for reading!

Looking for the fully functional version of the oozemancer class? Be sure to read up on the new playable class by clicking here: Oozemancer for Fifth Edition Dungeons & Dragons.

Coming next: Bard College of Ooze.

Art by Tomás Giorello for Conan the Barbarian (Del Ray).