Beholder Variants for Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition

Beholders are probably the D&Diest monster that ever D&Ded. These multi-eyed tyrants are true horrors, sure to send fear into the hearts of players everywhere.

Think we can make ’em even worse? Let’s find out!

Here’s what to expect from this article:

  • What is a beholder?
  • How do 5e beholders fight?
  • What 5e beholder variants are needed?
  • 5 new 5e beholder variants.

What is a beholder?

Beholders have been in every edition of Dungeons & Dragons since 1975 when Terry Kluntz created the very first one for the Greyhawk supplement. And they looked like this…

1st-ed-beholder
Yo, what’s up?

Like giant, flying meat balls covered in eye stalks, these paranoid, xenophobic, megalomaniacal aberrations hide away in their lairs and plot against a world they hate. Now, in fifth edition, the folks at Wizards of the Coast have really taken these weirdo monsters to the next level. In Volo’s Guide to Monsters, the “reproduction cycle” of the beholder is explained. Basically, they have a bad dream and pop! There’s a baby beholder. Not really a baby, mind you. But a clone and/or twisted version of the one that dream-birthed it.

Of course, beholders probably hate other beholders more than anything else in the world, so when a new beholder appears it quickly turns into a beholder death match between mom-dad and daughter-son.

Because beholder dreams are so weird and funky, different variations and spin-offs of beholders can emerge including gazers, death kisses, eye tyrants, and death tyrants. This, of course, makes my job creating variants super easy.

 

How do beholders fight?

Beholders are pretty smart. And smart monsters don’t fight on other people’s terms. Before you ever even meet the beholder, chances are you it’s sent its minions at you. And even you get past eye-daddy’s thugs, it’ll make sure to keep itself safe from unwamted intrustions.

If a beholder does have to dirty itself with combat, chances are it’s going to be in its lair and it’s going to be well prepared for whatever comes its way.

As usual, Keith Ammann has written up a fantastic analysis of the beholder’s tactics which you can read on his blog The Monsters Know What They’re Doing. But here’s the TL;DR version:

  • Beholders have a bite attack. You know… for when they just wanna screw with the adventurers instead of outright vaporizing them..
  • The beholder’s central eye has an antimagic cone which shuts down magic users (and itself, unfortunately).
  • All of its eyes have a bunch of special rays that are, well… what kind of make the beholder the nightmarish legend that it is. The rays are random, but since the beholder can fire 6 in a round, chances are it’s going to fire off some of its big guns fast.
  • The beholder will do its best to keep intruders at a distance, shutting down its center eye so it can zap anyone that comes at it. With a range of 120 ft., it can probably do this for a few rounds. Plus, it can fly, so there’s no reason it’ll be anywhere near the ground.
  • When things get close and personal, it’ll shut down particular targets with its anti-magic cone, while those outside of the cone can still get zapped.
  • If all that wasn’t bad enough, the beholder also has some pretty dandy lair actions that will assist it in combat including: slippery, slimy floors; grasping appendages coming from the ceiling and walls; and random eye rays.

As you can see, there’s a reason these guys make awesome boss monsters. Even at a challenge rating 13 (15 in its lair), there’s a pretty good chance that the beholder is going to take down at least one or two PC’s in a fight.

 

What 5e beholder variants are needed?

Creating beholder variants is a simple process. Basically, take the base beholder and think of a way to make it even more f’d up than before. Tie the horror that you’ve created to some sort of dream that the beholder may have had. And finish it off by giving it a kooky, eye-pun name and voila: you’ve just created a beholder.

Naturally, when it comes to cooking up weird D&D monsters, I turn to my 6-year old son, Jack to help me out. And he definitely delivered.

Here’s four beholder variants Jack came up with just off the top of his head:

  • A shadow beholder that’s made of shadow and can hide. Love it.
  • Another beholder that turns you into a beholder if it touches you. Kinda like a vargouille, but a beholder. Gross. But love it.
  • One kind of beholder that when you hit it, it splits into two beholders. Yikes. Love it.
  • He also put together a beholder out of Kinex and called it a “ridge beholder.” Kinda like a beholder that’s a dream catcher with eyeballs. Love it.

It would have taken me probably a week to come up with this stuff. Thanks, Jack!

To round out the bunch, I decided to add in a “eyesore.” The eyesore is a beholder that’s covered in eyeballs. Let’s just say that searching for a pic to represent that thing was one of the ickiest things I’ve ever done… and I used to work in the restaurant business!

 

5 beholder variants for Dungeons & Dragons fifth edition.

First up, we have the shadow beholder. I see this as a beholder that lost its way in the Shadowfell and eventually got sucked in; basically, the same back story as the shadow dragon template. I imagine that beholders don’t do so well in the Shadowfell. Already, they’re insanely paranoid and xenophobic. Once you add in the negative juju of the Plane of Shadow you’ve got yourself one bad mopey critter.

Next is the vargouille’ish beholder, which I’ll name an onlooker. The onlooker is a unique beholder-kin, born of a beholder that’s actually terrified of being alone. That beholder has nightmares of loneliness, and when it wakes from its trance, an onlooker emerges. The onlooker is a parasitic beholder that is driven by a never ending desire to create more beholders. Most beholders–including the one that created the onlooker–try to destroy these mutations as soon as they appear.

When a beholder dreams of being completed destroyed through disintegration, a gawker emerges. The gawker is an oozey beholder and not terribly bright. Its eye rays are a bit weaker, too. However, its one biggest strength is that when it’s hit with slashing weapons or lightning damage, it splits into two beholders, effectively doubling its damage output.

Sometimes, the dreams that deliver death tyrants don’t always produce the desired results. On those rare occasions, instead of rising as a powerful, undead tyrant, instead they rise as deadly, insane ridge beholders. When this happens, the beholder collapses in on itself, destroying its own skull in the process. Only the central eye and eyestalks remain, which bond together in a fleshy, circular pattern, like a twisted wheel made of sinew and eyes.  Ridge beholders are relentless killers, driven by a compulsion to eradicate any living thing that may pose a threat to it.

Finally, the eyesore is the result of a beholder dreaming that its enemies will sneak up on it and destroy it. The eyesore is nothing but a floating ball of eyes; it has no mouth, no central eye, and no eyestalks. Instead of rays, the eyesore creates powerful auras to ward off its foes and protect itself. Don’t let their ugly appearances fool you, though. They’re just as malicious and terrible as the rest of their beholder-kin, if not moreso.

 

eyesore

Eyesore

Large aberration, lawful evil


Armor Class 12

Hit Points 212 (25d10 + 75)

Speed 0 ft., fly 20 ft. (hover)


Abilities Str 10 (+0), Dex 14 (+2), Con 16 (+3), Int 18 (+4), Wis 16 (+3), Cha 17 (+3)


Saving Throws Int +9, Wis +8, Cha +6

Skills Deception +13, Perception +13

Condition Immunities prone

Senses blindsense 30 ft., darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 23

Languages understand Deep Speech and Undercommon but can’t speak, telepathy 120 ft.

Challenge 15 (13,000 XP)


Actions

Eye Powers. The eyesore uses two of the following magical eye powers:

  1. Charm Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must succeed on a DC 17 Wisdom saving throw or be charmed by the eyesore for 1 hour, or until the eyesore harms the creature.
  2. Paralyzing Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw or be paralyzed for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  3. Sickening Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw or take 18 (4d8) poison damage on a failed save and be poisoned for 1 minute, or half as much damage and not be poisoned on a successful one.
  4. Fear Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must succeed on a DC 17 Wisdom saving throw or be frightened for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  5. Slowing Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must succeed on a DC 17 Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the target’s speed is halved for 1 minute. In addition, the creature can’t take reactions, and it can take either an action or a bonus action on its turn, not both. The creature can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself with a success.
  6. Psychic Wave. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must make a DC 17 Intelligence saving throw, taking 36 (8d8) psychic damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful save.
  7. Telekinetic Field. The beholder can target a single object or creature within 30 feet of it. Any creature the beholder targets must make a DC 17 Strength saving throw or the eyesore moves it up to 30 feet in any direction. It is restrained by the aura’s crushing force until the start of the eyesore’s next turn or until the eyesore is incapacitated. If the target is an object weight 300 pounds or less that isn’t being worn or carried, it is moved up to 30 feet in any direction. The beholder can exert fine control on objects with this field, such as manipulating a simple tool or opening a door or a container.
  8. Healing Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore (including the eyesore) magically regain 36 (8d8) hit points and are freed from any curse, disease, poison, blindness, or deafness.
  9. Invulnerability Aura. A 15-foot radius globe surrounds the eyesore until the start of the eyesore’s next turn. Any spell of 5th level or higher cast from outside the barrier can’t affect creatures or objects within it. Even if the spell is cast using a higher level spell slot. Such a spell can target creatures and objects within the barrier but the spell has no effect on them. Similarly, the area within the barrier is excluded from the areas affected by such spells.
  10. Flame Aura. All creatures within 30 feet of the eyesore must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw, taking 36 (8d8) fire damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.

 

gawker

Gawker

Large aberration, neutral evil


Armor Class 16 (natural armor)

Hit Points 97 (13d10 + 26)

Speed 0 ft., fly 20 ft. (hover)


Abilities Str 10 (+0), Dex 14 (+2), Con 15 (+2), Int 12 (+1), Wis 10 (+0), Cha 13 (+1)


Skills Perception +6

Damage Immunities lightning, slashing

Condition Immunities prone

Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 16

Languages Deep Speech, Undercommon

Challenge 5 (1,800)


Slowing Gaze. When a creature that can see the gawker’s central eye starts its turn within 60 feet of the gawker, the gawker can force it to make a DC 17 Wisdom saving throw if the beholder isn’t incapacitated and can see the creature. A creature that fails the save has their speed halved for 1 minute. In addition, the creature can’t take reactions, and it can take either an action or a bonus action on its turn, not both. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Unless surprised, a creature can avert its eyes at the start of its turn to avoid the saving throw. If the creature does so it can’t see the gawker until the start of its next turn, when it can avert its eyes again. If the creature looks at the gawker in the meantime, it must immediately make the save.


Actions

Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +3 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (3d6) piercing damage.

Eye Rays. The gawker shoots one of the following magical eye rays at random, choosing one target it can see within 120 feet of it:

  1. Charm Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 13 Wisdom saving throw or be charmed by the gawker for 1 hour, or until the gawker harms the creature.
  2. Paralyzing Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or be paralyzed for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of eahch of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  3. Fire Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 13 Dexterity saving throw, taking 36 (8d8) fire damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.
  4. Telekinetic Ray. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC 13 Strength saving throw or the gawker moves it up to 30 feet in any direction. It is restrained by the ray’s telekinetic grip until the start of the gawker’s next turn or until the gawker is incapacitated.
  5. Enervation Ray. If the target is a creature, it must make a DC 13 Constitution saving throw, taking 36 (8d8) necrotic damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.
  6. Petrification Ray. The targeted creature must make a DC 13 Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, the creature begins to turn to stone and is restrained. It must repeat the saving throw at the end of its next turn. On a success, the effect ends. On a failure, the creature is petrified until freed by the greater restoration spell or other magic.

Reactions

Split. When a gawker that is Medium or Larger is subjected to lightning or slashing damage, it splits into two new gawkers if it has at least 20 hit points. Each new gawker has hit points equal to half the original gawker’s, rounded down. New gawkers are one size smaller than the original gawker.

 

onlooker

Onlooker

Tiny aberration, chaotic evil


Armor Class 16 (natural armor)

Hit Points 27 (6d4 + 12)

Speed 0 ft., fly 30 ft. (hover)


Abilities Str 6 (-2), Dex 18 (+4), Con 14 (+2), Int 15 (+2), Wis 15 (+2), Cha 15 (+2)


Saving Throws Int +4, Wis +4, Cha +4

Skills Perception +6, Stealth +10

Condition Immunities prone

Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 16

Languages Deep Speech, Undercommon

Challenge 2 (450 XP)


Actions

Multiattack. The onlooker uses its charm and eye rays.

Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +0 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 1 (1d6 – 2) piercing damage.

Charm. The onlooker targets a humanoid it can see within 30 feet of it. If the target can see the onlooker, the target must succeed on a DC 12 Wisdom saving throw against this magic or be charmed by the onlooker. The charmed target regards the onlooker as a trusted friend to be heeded and protected. Although the target isn’t under the onlooker’s control, it takes the onlooker’s requests or actions in the most favorable way it can, and it is a willing target for the onlooker’s conversion ray attack.

Each time the onlooker or the onlooker’s companions do anything harmful to the target, it can repeat the saving throw, ending the effect on itself on a success. Otherwise, the effect lasts 24 hours or until the onlooker is destroyed, is on a different plane of existence than the target, or takes a bonus action to end the effect.

Eye Rays. The onlooker shoots up to two of the following magical eye rays at one or two creatures it can see within 30 feet of it. It can use each ray only once on a turn.

  1. Paralyzing ray. The target must succeed on a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or be paralyzed for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  2. Wounding ray. The target must make a DC 12 Constitution saving throw, taking 13 (3d8) necrotic damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.
  3. Confusion ray. The target must make a DC 12 Wisdom saving throw, or it can’t take reactions until the end of its next turn. On its turn, the target can’t move, and it uses its action to make a melee or ranged attack against a randomly determined creature within range. If the target can’t attack, it does nothing on its turn.
  4. Conversion ray. The target must succeed on a DC 12 Charisma saving throw or become cursed. The cursed target loses 1 point of Charisma after each hour, as its head takes on aberrant aspects. When the cursed target’s Charisma becomes 2, it dies, and its head tears from its body and becomes a new onlooker. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before the transformation is complete can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.

 

ridge-beholder

Ridge Beholder

Large undead, chaotic evil


Armor Class 17 (natural armor)

Hit Points 170 (20d10 + 60)

Speed 0 ft., fly 20 ft. (hover)


Abilities Str 6 (-2), Dex 14 (+2), Con 16 (+3), Int 18 (+4), Wis 9 (-1), Cha 16 (+3)


Saving Throws Dex +7, Con +8

Skills Perception +9

Damage Resistance piercing

Damage Immunities poison

Condition Immunities charmed, exhaustion, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone

Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 19

Languages Deep Speech, Undercommon

Challenge 15 (13,000 XP)


Paralyzing Gaze. When a creature that can see the ridge beholder’s central eye starts its turn within 150 feet of the beholder, the beholder can force it to make a DC 17 Wisdom saving throw if the beholder isn’t incapacitated and can see the creature. A creature that fails the save is paralyzed for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Unless surprised, a creature can avert its eyes at the start of its turn to avoid the saving throw. If the creature does so it can’t see the beholder until the start of its next turn, when it can avert its eyes again. If the creature looks at the beholder in the meantime, it must immediately make the save.


Actions

Eye Rays. The beholder shoots three of the following magical eye rays at random (reroll duplicates), choosing one to three targets it can see within 120 feet of it.

  1. Weakening Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Strength save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Strength as its muscles begin to wither. The effect of the weakening ray is cumulative. If repeated weakening rays reduce the target’s Strength to 0, it withers into a skeleton and dies. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before it dies can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  2. Clumsiness Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Dexterity save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Dexterity as it starts to have trouble with its hand-eye coordination and speed. The effect of the clumsiness ray is cumulative. If repeated clumsiness rays reduce the target’s Dexterity to 1, it becomes permanently incapacitated. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before it dies can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  3. Sickness Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Constitution as it starts to grow sickly. The effect of the sickness ray is cumulative. If repeated sickness rays reduce the target’s Constitution to 0, it succumbs to its illness and dies. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before it dies can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  4. Stupefying Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Intelligence save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Intelligence as it starts to lose its memories and mental faculties. The effect of the disorientation ray is cumulative. If repeated stupefying rays reduce the target’s Intelligence to 1, it becomes a mindless automaton which will only follow the ridge beholder’s commands. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  5. Insanity Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Wisdom save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Wisdom as it starts to lose its ability to focus. The effect of the insanity ray is cumulative. If repeated insanity rays reduce the target’s Wisdom to 1, it enters into a gibbering, catatonic and becomes permanently incapacitated. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  6. Mutilation Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Charisma save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Charisma as it starts to lose its ability to focus. The effect of the mutilation ray is cumulative. If repeated mutilation rays reduce the target’s Charisma to 0, it loses all sense of self and dies, fading to nothing. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before it dies can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  7. Telekinetic Ray. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC 17 Strength saving throw or the beholder moves it up to 30 feet in any direction. It is restrained by the ray’s telekinetic grip until the start of the beholder’s next turn or until the beholder is incapacitated. If the target is an object weighting 300 pounds or less that isn’t being worn or carried, it is moved up to 30 feet in any direction. The beholder can also exert fine control on objects with this ray, such as manipulating a simple tool or opening a door or a container.
  8. Rust Ray. If the targeted creature is wearing nonmagical metal armor, it must succeed on a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw or its armor is partly corroded and takes a permanent and cumulative -1 penalty to the AC it offers. The armor is destroyed if the penalty reduces its AC to 10.
  9. Vampiric Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw, taking 13 (3d8) necrotic damage on a failed save.  The target’s hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to the necrotic damage taken and the beholder regains hit points equal to that amount. The reduction lasts until the target finishes a long rest. The target dies if this effect reduces its hit point maximum to 0. A humanoid slain in this way rises in 1d4 hours as a zombie under the beholder’s control.
  10. Death Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw or take 55 (10d10) necrotic damage. The target dies if the ray reduces it to 0 hit points.

Legendary Actions

The beholder can take 3 legendary actions, using the Eye Ray option below. It can take only one legendary action at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. The beholder regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Eye Ray. The beholder uses one random eye ray.

shadow-beholder

Shadow Beholder

Large aberration, lawful evil


Armor Class 18 (natural armor)

Hit Points 180 (19d10 + 76)

Speed 0 ft., fly 20 ft. (hover)


Abilities Str 10 (+0), Dex 14 (+2), Con 18 (+4), Int 17 (+3), Wis 15 (+2), Cha 17 (+3)


Saving Throws Int +8, Wis +7, Cha +8

Skills Perception +12, Stealth +12

Damage Resistances necrotic

Condition Immunities prone

Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 22

Languages Deep Speech, Undercommon

Challenge 14 (11,500 XP)


Living Shadow. While in dim light or darkness, the beholder has resistance to damage that isn’t force, psychic, or radiant.

Shadow Cone. The beholder’s central eye emits an invisible, magical 150-foot cone of all-encompassing shadow. At the start of each of its turns, the beholder decides which way the cone faces and whether the cone is active.

Any creature in that area must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage.

Shadow Stealth. While in dim light or darkness, the beholder can take the Hide action as a bonus action.

Sunlight Sensitivity. While in sunlight, the beholder has disadvantage on attacks rolls, as well as on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight.


Actions

Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit; reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (4d6) piercing damage.

Eye Rays. The beholder shoots three of the following magical eye rays at random (reroll duplicates), choosing one to three targets it can see within 120 feet of it:

  1. Blindness Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution saving throw or it is blinded for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  2. Curse Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Wisdom saving throw or become cursed for 1 minute. While the target is cursed, the beholder’s attacks and eye rays deal an extra 9 (2d8) necrotic damage to the target. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target can end the curse
  3. Fear Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Wisdom saving throw or be frightened for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns ending the effect on itself on a success.
  4. Slowing Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, the target’s speed is halved for 1 minute. In addition, the creature can’t take reactions, and it can take either an action or a bonus action on its turn not both. The creature can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.
  5. Enervation Ray. The targeted creature must make a DC 16 Constitution saving throw, taking 36 (8d8) necrotic damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.
  6. Banishing Ray. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC 16 Charisma saving throw or is banished to another plane of existence for 1 minute as if hit by the banishment spell. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, reappearing in the space it left or in the nearest unoccupied space if that space is occupied on a success. Otherwise, the target remains there until the effect ends.
  7. Telekinetic Ray. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC 16 Strength saving throw or the beholder moves it up to 30 feet in any direction. It is restrained by the ray’s telekinetic grip until the start of the beholder’s next turn or until the beholder is incapacitated. If the target is an object weighting 300 pounds or less that isn’t being worn or carried, it is moved up to 30 feet in any direction. The beholder can also exert fine control on objects with this ray, such as manipulating a simple tool or opening a door or a container.
  8. Strength Draining Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or take 18 (4d8) necrotic damage, and its Strength score is reduced by 1d4. The target dies if this reduces its Strength to 0. Otherwise, the reduction lasts until the target finishes a short or long rest. If a non-evil humanoid dies from this attack, a shadow rises from the corpse 1d4 hours later under the beholder’s control.
  9. Sickness Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution save or take 13 (3d8) necrotic damage and become cursed. The target loses 1 point of Constitution as it starts to grow sickly. The effect of the sickness ray is cumulative. If repeated sickness rays reduce the target’s Constitution to 0, it succumbs to its illness and dies. Casting remove curse, greater restoration, or a similar spell on the target before it dies can end the curse. Doing so undoes the changes made to the target by the curse.
  10. Death Ray. The targeted creature must succeed on a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw or take 55 (10d10) necrotic damage. The target dies if the ray reduces it to 0 hit points.

Legendary Actions

The beholder can take 3 legendary actions, using the Eye Ray option below. It can take only one legendary action at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. The beholder regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Eye Ray. The beholder uses one random eye ray.

 

Thanks for reading!

These are definitely some of the nastiest monsters I’ve ever created. So have fun tormenting your PC’s with them!

If there’s any requests you have or something (or someone) you’d like me to stat, feel free to drop a message below in the comments or contact me at hamrickbrands@gmail.com.

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Next up, we’re taking a stroll along the roots of the Gulthias tree: blights!

See you then!

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